Tag Archives: Activities

Forging a Lasting Bond with Grandchildren Activities

Grandparents and grandchildren come in all different shapes, sizes, ages, and energy levels with different interests, hobbies, and personalities.  The special relationship  between grandparents and grandchildren has the potential to be one of  life’s most precious.  Oftentimes miles separate grandparents and grandchildren, making regular time together difficult.  When together, the time is usually packed with fun and exciting activities.  Sometimes just the opposite is true, with grandparents living in the same city, neighborhood, or even house as their grandchildren.  While this is usually a positive thing in most aspects, it may be harder to think of fun activities to nurture the bond and grow the relationship when it’s so routine and familiar.  Rest assured, there are many grandchildren activities to keep both young and old happy.

It is important to pair personalities, physical capabilities, and interests when thinking about activities.  Many activities can be good for a broad spectrum of ages.

  • Gardening is a popular activity at any age.  The grandparent can share their knowledge and expertise while allowing the grandchildren to do most of the bending over and digging in dirt.  Then both can enjoy and share the fruits of their labor together.
  • Go for walks together.  This is an amazing opportunity for grandparents and grandchildren to get to know each other better.  Children often love to hear stories of their grandparents and parents childhood.  Depending on your location and energy level, this may mean a walk around the block, a stroll through a park, or a hike through the woods.  As a bonus, walking is great exercise for everyone!
  • Play games.  This can be as active or passive an activity as you desire.  For quieter indoor options, consider board games, card games, or puzzles.  You can head outdoors for games like croquet, bowling, or miniature golf.
  • Cook, bake, or craft together.  Different generations have different ideas and skills.  It can be a lot of fun to exchange ideas and teach each other different skills.  Often grandparents love to share their knowledge and expertise in various areas.  Grandchildren can be fortunate recipients of this if they take the time together.  Grandparents may even learn some new crafting and cooking skills themselves.  Grandchildren have much to offer as well.
  • Read together.  While this is a pleasant pastime for an individual, it can also be a great one for a pair.  Sitting and reading aloud can improve reading skills and pass the time.

Of course, this is by no means a comprehensive list.  There are so many fun activities for grandparents and grandchildren to do together.  Don’t limit yourselves. Look into things that make one or both parties feel passionate and excited and explore them together!

How to make New Years Eve Rock for the kids

New Years Eve is well known for the champagne, staying up late, kissing, and glamorous outfits. But what about those who are a bit younger? They definitely want to be able to ring in the new year with just as much fun and pizazz as their parents and older siblings! So here are a few Holiday Party Ideas to make their night just as memorable as your own.

  • Sleep over party! If you just so happen to have young ones of your own and a lack of plans for NYE, why not offer to host a sleep over for the neighborhood kids. Other parents may be appreciative of the night out, or may even offer to help you out! As a result the kids will have a safe and fun place to be for the night. Have the kids get dressed up and provide themed snacks like cupcakes bedecked in glittery sprinkles, cookies decorated like clocks, or dip sugar cones in chocolate and then decorate to look like NYE hats. Hand out noise makers and bubbles to celebrate and plastic glasses of sparkling cider. If you want to avoid the sugar of cider and the possible mess, seltzer or sparkling water adds the bubbly without the extra sugar.
  • Karaoke party! If your kids are a bit older and still want to have their friends over, try busting out the karaoke machine or singing video games. Everyone can take turns belting out their favorite tunes between munching on finger foods and dips. Kick it up a notch and offer prizes for a contest. Set up a rotating panel of judges (so everyone gets to sing and everyone gets to judge) to pass out scores. Just make sure everyone stays nice with their comments! Just Dance! and other dance related games can make a fun addition to a karaoke party. Contestants take turns getting in front of the television and trying to match their own smooth moves to the avatar on the screen.
  • Glam it up! If you have teens living at home who want in on the fun but you want to make sure they stay out of harm and out of trouble, let them invite their friends to the house. The kids can dress to kill for the night. Set up appetizer tables and a “bar” with virgin mixed drinks (just make sure they stay unspiked!). A photobooth can add a fun element as well. Set up a glitzy backdrop with 2014 or “Happy New Year” and leave out props like boas and masks for the guests to use. Either set up a point and shoot digital camera with a remote on a tripod or a webcam on a laptop. Guests can take their own pictures to be posted to a social media site or party website later. Have your kids make a fun playlist of music and offer games like Apples to Apples to keep the laughs coming and everyone actively having a good time.

The most important part of New Year’s Eve is to have a good time and make sure that everyone stays safe, happy, and healthy so they can enjoy the coming year.

Christmas Tradition-Thinking Outside the Gift Box

Some Christmas traditions are passed down through generations.  Others are established intentionally to preserve the part of Christmas that is important to a family.  Sometimes though, traditions rise out of the ashes of human tragedy.

In 1999, a family of six was involved in a tragic car accident.  Three of the four children who were injured in the accident would not have made it had it not been for the heroic actions of the rescue personnel who arrived at the scene.  Several months after that awful day, the children, having finally been released from the hospital, traveled back to the rescue service stations to personally thank the men and women who had so bravely fought for their lives but it just didn’t seem to be enough.

In their hometown, the fire company has a tradition of putting hundreds of lights on the fire trucks and rescue vehicles on Christmas Eve.  Santa Claus climbs aboard the ladder truck and the vehicles travel from one neighborhood to the next blowing their horns with sirens blaring. The firefighters walk alongside handing out candy canes and toys to the children who come out to see them.

The family who was saved by the firefighters decided that one year they would turn the tables on them and instead of receiving candy canes from the fire company would instead give goodies to the fire station for those working on Christmas day to enjoy.  They set to work.  They baked cinnamon rolls for Christmas morning and put  them in a gift box along with cookies, caramel corn, candy, hot chocolate, microwave popcorn, hard tack candy and a thank you card explaining how appreciative they were for people who risk their lives to save the lives of others.  (After all, that is what happened the first Christmas when Christ came to earth with the sole mission of selflessly giving his life for the world.) The children stood anxiously along the road awaiting the fire trucks arrival and were delighted when the firefighter received their gift with a surprised, but appreciative smile and a tear in his eye.  From that time on, they asked every year to do it again and it soon became a Christmas tradition.

Even though those children are now young adults, you will still find them standing along the side of the road on Christmas Eve with their box of goodies in hand.  Some of the neighbors who have seen them do this every year have also jumped on board and offer their own gifts and thanks to the firefighters.

For them, Christmas is a time to remember how much they have received through the sacrifice of others.  It’s their Christmas tradition. And I might add, it’s their favorite one.

Nine Wonderful Children’s Wintry Party Themes

The winter months are quickly approaching and a children’s birthday party that lands during those months is challenging to plan. But if you use some creativity, each season offers lots of potentially fun activities or themes which will make any party special. Yes, wintertime is just full of great children’s wintry party themes!

A Winter Carnival

Make up games that children would play at a fair or carnival but use a winter theme. You could set up stations for different games. For instance, establish a booth with tin cans lined up on the edge of a table and have the children try to knock them down by propelling a snowball at the cans. You could let the children have sledding races or create stations for snowball bowling. Hand out prizes to the winners that are fitting of a carnival like a stuffed animal and, since it’s a carnival, make sure to serve fun carnival food like pretzels, cotton candy, popcorn and hot chocolate.

A Snowman Competition

This could end up being one of the best activities! Split the kids into even teams and place the teams at different locations in your yard. This might be a good activity for the front yard—providing you have the space—and you can get a jump on decorating for Christmas at the same time! Old accessories and clothing should be collected ahead of time to supply the kids with something to clothe their snowman. After all, there’s nothing worse than a naked snowman! Also, don’t forget about supplying them with carrots, raisins or berries and sticks for noses, eyes, mouths and arms—what’s a snowman without a face? You and other parents should stand by as judges and, when everyone is finished with their snowman, pick the best one and present the winning team with some kind of an award. Snowballs, a snowman pizza and a snowman ice cream cake make tasty treats to serve inside to hungry children after all the excitement.

Snow Castle Party

Who says you need sand and sunshine to make a castle? That white stuff in your back—or front—yard can turn out to be an asset. Throw a snow castle constructing party! At this party, kids should come all bundled up and ready to spend lots of time outside using plastic toy shovels, beach pails and different kinds of carving tools to make a castle out of snow. You can have the children work together to make one big castle or make it into a competition between two teams—either way, the kids are sure to have a blast! When the fun outdoors is finished, bring the kids indoors to warm up with some delicious chili or soup and hot chocolate; but don’t forget those marshmallows! Snow white frosting and flaked coconut will make a great wintery topping for just about any dessert.

Winter Olympics

Arrange competitions and games for kids to enjoy that are built on ideas from the winter Olympic events. Put together events of snowshoe racing, snowball throwing contests and snow mound jumping, just to name a few. Be sure to have a different award for first, second and third place winners for each event. Decorations should be set to the theme of the winter Olympics—draw the Olympic rings in the snow in your back yard and use food coloring to show off the Olympic ring colors. You can also hang up paper torches inside your house and the birthday cake should be red, white and blue.

Winter Pool Party

Why should a few inches of snow stop the children from enjoying one of summer’s best activities? Indoor pools render the chance for kids to swim, splash and celebrate in a regulated climate while the weather outdoors may be frigid. You may be able to rent a pool in a community center, hotel or fitness center and decorations can be left to the imagination. You could just have tropical-colored decorations to symbolize summer. But wouldn’t it be fun to have the best of both seasons? Purchase inflatable palm trees and decorate them with paper snowflakes. How about snowflake-printed towels lain over lawn chairs? The cake could be a large swimming pool with polar bear figurines on top.

Ice Skating

Bring the children to a safe skating lake or pond for the party or rent an ice rink for a few hours. If you choose to rent an ice rink, you’ll need to rent one four to six weeks in advance; be sure to ask about package deals and if you can bring in food from home. You’ll want to have parents nearby that are good skaters so that they can help the kids that don’t know how to ice skate. Play some fun, upbeat music and let the children free-skate. Integrate a few games such as a skating version of red light/green light. The birthday child stands in front of the rest of the children but a little bit of distance away with his or her back toward them. When the child says, “green light” the rest of the kids will start to skate ahead; when the child says, “red light” and turns around, all the children have to be stopped. If the birthday child catches anyone moving forward then that person has to go back to the starting line. The first child to tag the birthday child wins the game and then takes their turn in that spot. For decorations you could hang up icicles, paper ice skates and snowflakes around the rink. If you got a package deal, hot dogs or pizza usually is included. The cake could be in the form of an icy pond with figure skaters adorning the top or in the shape of an ice skate.

Snowflake Ball

Although snow may get old for adults as the season wears on, for children the magic never fades. For this type of party, rent a banquet hall and decorate it with icicle lights and snowflakes dangling over their heads while they’re on the dance floor. Use synthetic snow and sparkles to create a wintery invitation in the entryway. For the table, purchase shimmering white and blue place settings on a snowflake tablecloth. An artificial snow making machine and ice sculptures would be an enhancement to the magical feel of the party. You can’t forget the entertainment! Make sure to have some party games that are suitable for the snowflake party such as Snowflake Trivia. Get several adults to write winter or Christmas trivia questions on paper cut-out snowflakes—one question per snowflake. Then each child pulls a snowflake out of a bowl and tries to answer the question; the child who answers the most questions wins. Or you could hire someone to give basic ballroom dance lessons. For the menu, snowflake cookies, white hot chocolate, a tray of veggie and cheese pieces that are cut into snowflakes and a snowflake cake would be a hit.

Snow Sculpting

Snow sculpting is a lot of fun and what child wouldn’t love to do this? Hand out to each child a portion of snow to use. Make up ahead of time a box full of “props” that the kids can pick from to adorn their sculpture with. Items could include: masks, boas, beads, sunglasses, flowers, leaves and rocks. Pick a time limit—say, an hour—and let the children develop their best sculpture during that time frame. Take a vote to confirm a winner in several different categories like “best executed”, “most creative” and “best over-all”. For the cake, you could have one specially made that looks like an ice sculpture!

Penguin Party

Just about all children love animals and who doesn’t love penguins? They’re so cute and would make a great party theme! Decorating can be very simple: white and black streamers and balloons hung on the walls and ceiling of the party room and you could buy a penguin-printed tablecloth with black place settings and white napkins. If you want an extra touch, place some plush penguins of different sizes around the room. Entertaining the kids will be just as easy as decorating. You can show them a movie like “Happy Feet” or “Mr. Popper’s Penguins”, give them a penguin craft to make and play some standard games in which the children will have to imitate the penguin like penguin waddle relay races. The kids will absolutely love your penguin cupcakes cake!

Whether you’re trying to get rid of those winter blues or planning a birthday party, one of these winter party themes are sure to be a hit. You’ll want to check out our great website for everything you’ll need for your party!

Children’s party ideas: 3 sweet cookie recipes

Looking for some easy and sweet cookie recipes for your next children’s party? Then look no further! Below you will find 3 terrific cookie recipes that will satisfy even the pickiest eater, and create leftovers that the whole family will enjoy.

Peanut Butter Sweeties

Similar to a peanut butter blossom, this cookie variation features the beloved chocolate kiss atop a peanut butter cookie, and can be made in less than an hour. Head to the store and buy a bag of your favorite candies, and follow this recipe by Miss Betty Crocker. This recipe can be used for anything from a birthday party to even a Valentine’s Day Themed affair, where you replace the chocolate kiss with a chocolate heart.

Lovely Chocolate Cake Mix Cookies

These simple (and cute!) cookies are as easy to make as they sound. It’s as easy as following baking directions for a cake. Simply, get a box of Devil’s Food cake mix, follow the preparation instructions, throw in a dash of vanilla, some sprinkles, maybe add some M&M’s for color and flair, and mix it all in a bowl. Once thickened, roll into balls and bake per the directions. Voila! Fudgy, cake cookies for all of your partygoers to enjoy.

Snickers Bar Stuffed Cookies

Gosh… did you mouth just water? This recipe takes the disguise of a regular chocolate cookie recipe (the unbeatable classic loved by generations) and replaces the chocolate chips with Snickers bars. Simply, make your favorite cookie recipe, chill for 30 minutes, remove from the fridge, press pieces of Snickers into the dough balls, form into cookies, bake. Seriously, if you thought chocolate chip cookies were good before? You must try this recipe. Definitely a crowd pleaser.

Encouraging writing skills: Boys edition

It’s a common misconception that boys are better at math and girls are better at writing and language arts. This popular belief, according to developmental psychologists actually has no basis in reality, but is more of a reflection of the beliefs and teaching of society.

These days, teachers and parents of girls are often encouraged to allow their girls the same math and science play opportunities boys have, because there’s no genetic predisposition to disliking bugs or engineering.

But what can parents of boys do to ensure that they are encouraging writing skills for their son in language arts and communication?

One increasingly popular category of children’s literature has emerged for “reluctant readers” and it’s often called “The gross-out book.”  By appealing to a boy’s enthusiasm for passing gas and other bodily functions, these books appeal to a child’s sense of the taboo.  Luckily, most boys have other interests that parents can appeal to, in case they’re more interested in helping their sons develop a social awareness that extends beyond the idea that “Everybody Poops.”

Homeschoolers and other educators remind us that children’s interests can often be used as a gateway for other learning. Put another way, it isn’t necessary to “make learning fun” because learning is already fun. For boys who enjoy playing video games, there are gamer magazines and websites with plenty of cheats and playing advice to help turn a reluctant reader into an eager reader.  It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to see that “Hop on Pop” is far less interesting to an 8 yr old boy than “Six tricks for Minecraft world domination.” The lesson here is for parents to find written materials that support the child’s interests instead of boring him to tears.

Another tool for helping boys harness their literary skills is a nice set of boys stationery.  Parents can use stationary as a learning tool by packing notes in lunch boxes and leaving notes throughout the house.  Making a habit of leaving scavenger-hunt-like clues can be fun for kids to decode especially when there’s a prize at the end.  Parents who are in the habit of leaving notes are illustrating the practical aspects of written communication and giving their son reasons to write.  Finding pleasure in written communication can be the difference between “I don’t want to do my writing homework” and “Hey Mom, did I spell Disneyland correctly?”

Some educational reform advocates are concerned that kids are being taught the mechanics of reading and writing at the expense of their enthusiasm. When a child is interested in something and excited about it, it’s difficult to keep them from learning more. One of the best things a parent can do to help their children succeed in reading and writing is to model the importance of communication and provide the child with the tools to use it in his or her life.

Check out our selection of boys stationery to help your little guy embrace his passion for the written word.

Not enough room, but an abundance of toys

Have you ever gone into your kid’s bedrooms—or playrooms—and wondered where the floor went? Dolls, Legos, puzzles, hot wheels cars—there are so many toys all over the place that it looks like a typhoon hit the room! Maybe, until that very moment, you never realized how many toys your kids actually had. But this is a great incentive to do something about the clutter and organize your kid’s abundance of toys. You could even get your children to help you!

Arrange into Groups

Separate all of your child’s toys into different categories. For example: dolls, building blocks, action figures, reading items, cooking materials and outdoor toys are just a few good category names. Any accessories—like doll clothes—could be kept with the items so they won’t get lost. Outside toys should be kept in the garage or basement away from the inside toys.

Books, movies or CDs should be stored on accessible shelves in their bedroom or playroom. Why not sort them by age and give each of your children their own shelf? If you and your kids borrow books from your local library, be sure to allocate a shelf for that as well so that the borrowed items don’t get lost or mixed up with the books your kids own.

Reachable Storage

You should provide shelves, hooks and storage places for your kids to gain access to which will not only make it easy for them to pick up their toys, but encourage them to do so. Start out by buying a toy box or you could convert a big, plastic tote which makes a terrific toy box. The larger toys will fit perfectly in a toy box and allows for simple clean-up by your children.

Stuffed animals and other bulky, but light, objects can be pulled up off of the floor and put into mesh fabric that could be hung on the walls. The toys and animals will be seen but out of the way. To store smaller stuffed animals or dolls, a shoe holder is a clever idea and it can be hung anywhere that your child is able to reach.

Toys that have tiny parts like puzzles, building blocks or Legos may be put away in transparent, plastic bins with lids; if your child is at a reading age, you could also label each bin as to its contents. Likewise, wooden wine racks are terrific storage areas and can be found at any local thrift store or garage sale; many used wine racks are just like new! Use cylinder containers—like a Pringles potato chip can—and fill it with tiny cars or other little items; then place the full cylinders into the wooden wine rack cubbyholes.

If your little ones like to play dress-up chests, old dressers or trunks are wonderful storage for old clothes and accessories. Sift through your own hats, purses and clothes in your closets—maybe there’s something you could throw in the “Dress-up Box”!

For those miscellaneous things that don’t really have a home in any category, utilize wicker or plastic laundry baskets.

Toy Library

What is a toy library, you ask? Well, it’s a toy co-operative that’s a lot like a regular library except that you take out toys instead of books. A toy co-operative buys durable, top-quality, hand-made wooden toys from a senior’s workshop and non-profit agencies for the mentally impaired. There’s a small annual fee that you have to pay to belong to a toy library; when you pay the fee you and your children are allowed to go in and pick out toys such as trucks, games, cars, gorgeous puzzles—there are all kinds of toys to choose from for young kids!

If there isn’t a toy library in your community, maybe you and your neighborhood families could start one. The children will love being able to select and play with new toys every two weeks—and the kids may even get to play with something you might otherwise not have been able to afford to buy for them.

Art Area

There isn’t a youngster out there that doesn’t like to paint or draw. If you have the space in your child’s playroom, set up an easel so they can let their imagination run wild! But what do you do with all the paints and art supplies when they’re not in use? A bathroom, wall or floor cabinet is a good choice that can be kept or hung in the same area as the easel or in a separate room like the basement or laundry room. If you purchase a wall cabinet, be sure you hang it at a height that can be easily reached by your children. Keep items like colored pencils, crayons, paper, finger paints as well as other art supplies on the enclosed shelves of the cabinet. Inform your children that when they’re done in the art area, you expect them to clean up the mess and all of the items they use to be put back in the cabinet.

Kids need to learn how to properly care for their possessions and you can not only teach them how but be a good example for them by treating your own belongings with care. Just like almost every other item in your home, toys occasionally need to be wiped down with a damp cloth. You should show your children how to do this properly so they won’t ruin their toys.

Always remember, in this case, less is more. Your children will learn to cherish their toys and belongings if they have only a few of them. Set up a frequent “sort and purge” day—maybe once a month or so—and help them go through their toys. Urge your kids to give away to charity the toys they don’t play with or use anymore.

One last thing, if you started teaching your children at an early age to pick up after themselves, chances are they’ll clean their playroom all on their own. But if you haven’t, then now is the time to teach them to pick up their toys and other belongings. It’ll teach them to be responsible as well as how to organize!

Friday Amy Update: Gracie’s Birthday

My week began with a celebration (it ended with one too but more on that later)! After church on Sunday, we piled into the car and drove up to the mountains to where Joey’s parents live to celebrate his father’s 65th birthday with all my in-laws. When we all gather, we total 19. They live in a sweet little home near the mountains and we always have lots of fun eating, playing with the kids and catching up.

photo

Monday morning Emily (my oldest who is 15 years old) and I woke nice and early to hit the ice rink. She had a very important U.S. Figure Skating Test she needed to take as she continues to check them off her list. It’s a pass/fail kind of test and she… passed!! Whew. Then off to school. She only had one final today… in P.E. Really? Yes, apparently. I was at the office throughout the morning planning and meeting with staff. Mondays are usually my catch up days when it comes to AA and the house. I make a conscious effort not to work on Sundays. I don’t even check the orders. So between work, home and kid’s stuff the emails pile up a tad and it takes me most the day to get my checklist down to a manageable length. Since I was at the office, this catch up day was a little more challenging. Corban is taking his first swimming class every night this week and it started on Monday afternoon at my neighbor’s backyard pool. A swim instructor came to teach a bunch of the neighborhood kids a thing or two! We were supposed to go to a cookout with some friends but Joey had a rough day and I was close to my limit. It was a cookout where you bring the kids and I knew I’d have to have one hand on Corban the whole time. So with all those factors it added up to “Sorry, we can’t make it.” Whew… so thankful for my bed!

My sweet niece has been watching Corban a few mornings for me, since he’s been out of school. But I decided to keep Grace and Corban all to myself on Tuesday because I had to take my mother to the airport (who went to go see her mother in TX). So I made it my day to run errands and not work too much. We were out most the day except we did come home for lunch. Grace is my musician and she has her piano lessons on Tuesday afternoons which she really looks forward to. Her lessons are short but I managed to get a quick run in while Corban played at a nearby playground… he plays and I run circles around him on the little path that winds through the park. I’m sure I look a little funny but sometimes you just gotta do what ya gotta do. Then I picked up Grace, picked up Emily from school and we all headed and got a quick dip in the pool. I wanted Corban to get some practice in before his swim class. Another crazy busy day for me. I’m not used to this! I admire you single moms out there on days like this… and I didn’t even work!

On Wednesday my niece came back to watch the kiddos! Woo Hoo! And I ran out to buy gifts for my sweet Gracie’s birthday! That was fun shopping and it went smoothly too. But it did take me all morning to find just the right little items. I ran to Target and found some pool toys, pjs, and a sweet little top. I ran to a sports store to find a little tank and shorts to keep her cool in this hot SC summer that is fast approaching. Then I ran to REI to get her big gift, an ENO (a hammock she can hang between our trees in the backyard). Emily has one too, so it will be a sister bonding thing, which I love! Speaking of Emily… she took her last exam today and she is done with her freshman year of high school!! Emily had a figure skating lesson and then back to Corban’s swim lesson. He is the oldest in his little class but you’d never know it. He’ll get it, I know he will. Then before we went to bed Emily and I decorated the kitchen with tons of streamers and balloons for Grace to wake up to.

Happy 11th Birthday to my sweet Grace!!! The kids and I piled in the car to go get donuts (a big treat for this paleo family)! Then off to Barnes and Noble to browse the toys and books. Emily found a classy journal that she bought. We just happened to come when it was story times so Corban and I listened to the story (well to be honest, Corban kinda listened and I checked my email on my phone) and then did a craft! Nice! Grace found a book that I bought her (it was her birthday after all) and she bought a little toy with some of her birthday money. It was great outing which is rare with Corban. He has really turned a corner these last few months and it so nice to have a child who has finally understood HOW to behave (most of the time). Grace wanted a Subway sandwich so we grabbed it and took it home to eat an early lunch. Grace’s best friend, Elizabeth, came over and then we hit the pool! It was then that Corban put his whole face in the water for a number of seconds for the first time! He was so excited he just kept wanting to do it over and over. He couldn’t wait to show his swim instructor that afternoon! So exciting! Then home for a taco dinner, presents and a quick swing in the new ENO! Grace had all kinds of things she wanted to do including glow the dark bubbles (which unintentionally squirted all over the bathroom which you could see when you turned the lights out!), games and crafts. They were out by 10:30 and so was I… thank goodness.

grace

Today is looking just as busy as the rest as we plan to hit the pool again since Elizabeth is still hanging with us, more errands, and one more swim class. I need to clean the house because I’m hosting a baby shower tomorrow afternoon and we’re going out on a double date with friends. Work? What’s that? It has not really existed this week since the kids have been home and we had a big girl turning 11! But I have a wonderful husband and staff to run the show. I am so thankful for them. They allow me to go to the pool with my kiddos and shop during normal business hours for my daughter’s birthday. It is truly a luxury I am so very thankful for.

ENO

Teacher Appreciation Day Contest

May 6th is Teacher Appreciation Day and it’s just around the corner! We are so thankful for all the teachers who have helped us grow and who have supported us every day, that we are channeling our excitement into a contest!

Teacher appreciation day contest

Tell us something fun or encouraging your child’s teacher did this year! We’d love to hear from kids, too! Up for grabs is a coupon code for 30% off on your next order at AmyAdele.com AND a set of personalized stationery and address labels for your favorite teacher!

Here’s how it will work: Today through Sunday, post a comment to this blog entry with your favorite teacher story. The story must be about a current teacher. You can share your story in the Leave a Reply field found at the bottom of this particular post.

One story per visitor, please. Multiple entries will disqualify your entry into the contest. Contest is not valid in certain states, so please check state contest laws before entering. All entries must be submitted by 11:59 PM Eastern Time on Tuesday, April 29th, 2014. The winner will be chosen at random from all of the entrants. Once the winner is chosen they will be contacted via email. Be sure to include a valid e-mail address in the email field, so we can get back in touch with you. How easy is that?

We are waiting with great anticipation to hear your stories…so share away!

Happy Earth Day!

Happy Earth Day!

There are many simple things you can do to protect our planet, each of which might not seem terribly consequential, but put together, they all add up. A beach is made of millions of grains of sand deposited over time – not all earth-friendly gestures have to be as big as planting a forest. To that end, we want to share the importance of recycling and using post consumer products. It’s a simple change you can make to reduce your footprint. Here are a few quick facts about recycling:

  • Only 30% of waste is recycled, but we have the potential to recycle 75%.
  • Also, if every American recycled their newspapers, it would save 250 million trees each year. That’s a lot of trees – and that’s just with recycling one paper item, by one country. Think if the whole world recycled all the paper we generate – phone books, school papers, junk mail…
  • In 2010, Americans threw away $2.8 billion worth of paper.
  • And 37% of paper for American mills is recycled.
  • Recycling paper doesn’t just save trees – it also takes 40% less energy.
  • And just to make you appreciate paper a little more…before toilet paper, you might have had to use corn cobs or leaves. (Toilet paper is also available in post-consumer form.)

At Amy Adele, every single product is made with 100% post consumer paper, and by asking friends and family to recycle our stationery, you can extend the life of a sheet of paper over time – who knows where it might end up? Also, our packing peanuts are 100% biodegradable. They are made from starch, so they dissolve in water, and you could even eat them! That is if you were REALLY hungry. 🙂

For a fun project with your kids this Earth Day, make up a story about a recycled piece of paper. Where has it been? How many people has it seen? What was it used for? Feel free to share your kids’ best and most creative ideas in the comments – we’d love to hear them. If you just received your order  show the kids how you can make packing peanuts disappear. Feel free to post reaction videos or pictures to our Facebook, Google+, or tag us on Instagram.