Tag Archives: Creative

Nine Wonderful Children’s Wintry Party Themes

The winter months are quickly approaching and a children’s birthday party that lands during those months is challenging to plan. But if you use some creativity, each season offers lots of potentially fun activities or themes which will make any party special. Yes, wintertime is just full of great children’s wintry party themes!

A Winter Carnival

Make up games that children would play at a fair or carnival but use a winter theme. You could set up stations for different games. For instance, establish a booth with tin cans lined up on the edge of a table and have the children try to knock them down by propelling a snowball at the cans. You could let the children have sledding races or create stations for snowball bowling. Hand out prizes to the winners that are fitting of a carnival like a stuffed animal and, since it’s a carnival, make sure to serve fun carnival food like pretzels, cotton candy, popcorn and hot chocolate.

A Snowman Competition

This could end up being one of the best activities! Split the kids into even teams and place the teams at different locations in your yard. This might be a good activity for the front yard—providing you have the space—and you can get a jump on decorating for Christmas at the same time! Old accessories and clothing should be collected ahead of time to supply the kids with something to clothe their snowman. After all, there’s nothing worse than a naked snowman! Also, don’t forget about supplying them with carrots, raisins or berries and sticks for noses, eyes, mouths and arms—what’s a snowman without a face? You and other parents should stand by as judges and, when everyone is finished with their snowman, pick the best one and present the winning team with some kind of an award. Snowballs, a snowman pizza and a snowman ice cream cake make tasty treats to serve inside to hungry children after all the excitement.

Snow Castle Party

Who says you need sand and sunshine to make a castle? That white stuff in your back—or front—yard can turn out to be an asset. Throw a snow castle constructing party! At this party, kids should come all bundled up and ready to spend lots of time outside using plastic toy shovels, beach pails and different kinds of carving tools to make a castle out of snow. You can have the children work together to make one big castle or make it into a competition between two teams—either way, the kids are sure to have a blast! When the fun outdoors is finished, bring the kids indoors to warm up with some delicious chili or soup and hot chocolate; but don’t forget those marshmallows! Snow white frosting and flaked coconut will make a great wintery topping for just about any dessert.

Winter Olympics

Arrange competitions and games for kids to enjoy that are built on ideas from the winter Olympic events. Put together events of snowshoe racing, snowball throwing contests and snow mound jumping, just to name a few. Be sure to have a different award for first, second and third place winners for each event. Decorations should be set to the theme of the winter Olympics—draw the Olympic rings in the snow in your back yard and use food coloring to show off the Olympic ring colors. You can also hang up paper torches inside your house and the birthday cake should be red, white and blue.

Winter Pool Party

Why should a few inches of snow stop the children from enjoying one of summer’s best activities? Indoor pools render the chance for kids to swim, splash and celebrate in a regulated climate while the weather outdoors may be frigid. You may be able to rent a pool in a community center, hotel or fitness center and decorations can be left to the imagination. You could just have tropical-colored decorations to symbolize summer. But wouldn’t it be fun to have the best of both seasons? Purchase inflatable palm trees and decorate them with paper snowflakes. How about snowflake-printed towels lain over lawn chairs? The cake could be a large swimming pool with polar bear figurines on top.

Ice Skating

Bring the children to a safe skating lake or pond for the party or rent an ice rink for a few hours. If you choose to rent an ice rink, you’ll need to rent one four to six weeks in advance; be sure to ask about package deals and if you can bring in food from home. You’ll want to have parents nearby that are good skaters so that they can help the kids that don’t know how to ice skate. Play some fun, upbeat music and let the children free-skate. Integrate a few games such as a skating version of red light/green light. The birthday child stands in front of the rest of the children but a little bit of distance away with his or her back toward them. When the child says, “green light” the rest of the kids will start to skate ahead; when the child says, “red light” and turns around, all the children have to be stopped. If the birthday child catches anyone moving forward then that person has to go back to the starting line. The first child to tag the birthday child wins the game and then takes their turn in that spot. For decorations you could hang up icicles, paper ice skates and snowflakes around the rink. If you got a package deal, hot dogs or pizza usually is included. The cake could be in the form of an icy pond with figure skaters adorning the top or in the shape of an ice skate.

Snowflake Ball

Although snow may get old for adults as the season wears on, for children the magic never fades. For this type of party, rent a banquet hall and decorate it with icicle lights and snowflakes dangling over their heads while they’re on the dance floor. Use synthetic snow and sparkles to create a wintery invitation in the entryway. For the table, purchase shimmering white and blue place settings on a snowflake tablecloth. An artificial snow making machine and ice sculptures would be an enhancement to the magical feel of the party. You can’t forget the entertainment! Make sure to have some party games that are suitable for the snowflake party such as Snowflake Trivia. Get several adults to write winter or Christmas trivia questions on paper cut-out snowflakes—one question per snowflake. Then each child pulls a snowflake out of a bowl and tries to answer the question; the child who answers the most questions wins. Or you could hire someone to give basic ballroom dance lessons. For the menu, snowflake cookies, white hot chocolate, a tray of veggie and cheese pieces that are cut into snowflakes and a snowflake cake would be a hit.

Snow Sculpting

Snow sculpting is a lot of fun and what child wouldn’t love to do this? Hand out to each child a portion of snow to use. Make up ahead of time a box full of “props” that the kids can pick from to adorn their sculpture with. Items could include: masks, boas, beads, sunglasses, flowers, leaves and rocks. Pick a time limit—say, an hour—and let the children develop their best sculpture during that time frame. Take a vote to confirm a winner in several different categories like “best executed”, “most creative” and “best over-all”. For the cake, you could have one specially made that looks like an ice sculpture!

Penguin Party

Just about all children love animals and who doesn’t love penguins? They’re so cute and would make a great party theme! Decorating can be very simple: white and black streamers and balloons hung on the walls and ceiling of the party room and you could buy a penguin-printed tablecloth with black place settings and white napkins. If you want an extra touch, place some plush penguins of different sizes around the room. Entertaining the kids will be just as easy as decorating. You can show them a movie like “Happy Feet” or “Mr. Popper’s Penguins”, give them a penguin craft to make and play some standard games in which the children will have to imitate the penguin like penguin waddle relay races. The kids will absolutely love your penguin cupcakes cake!

Whether you’re trying to get rid of those winter blues or planning a birthday party, one of these winter party themes are sure to be a hit. You’ll want to check out our great website for everything you’ll need for your party!

Children’s party ideas: 3 sweet cookie recipes

Looking for some easy and sweet cookie recipes for your next children’s party? Then look no further! Below you will find 3 terrific cookie recipes that will satisfy even the pickiest eater, and create leftovers that the whole family will enjoy.

Peanut Butter Sweeties

Similar to a peanut butter blossom, this cookie variation features the beloved chocolate kiss atop a peanut butter cookie, and can be made in less than an hour. Head to the store and buy a bag of your favorite candies, and follow this recipe by Miss Betty Crocker. This recipe can be used for anything from a birthday party to even a Valentine’s Day Themed affair, where you replace the chocolate kiss with a chocolate heart.

Lovely Chocolate Cake Mix Cookies

These simple (and cute!) cookies are as easy to make as they sound. It’s as easy as following baking directions for a cake. Simply, get a box of Devil’s Food cake mix, follow the preparation instructions, throw in a dash of vanilla, some sprinkles, maybe add some M&M’s for color and flair, and mix it all in a bowl. Once thickened, roll into balls and bake per the directions. Voila! Fudgy, cake cookies for all of your partygoers to enjoy.

Snickers Bar Stuffed Cookies

Gosh… did you mouth just water? This recipe takes the disguise of a regular chocolate cookie recipe (the unbeatable classic loved by generations) and replaces the chocolate chips with Snickers bars. Simply, make your favorite cookie recipe, chill for 30 minutes, remove from the fridge, press pieces of Snickers into the dough balls, form into cookies, bake. Seriously, if you thought chocolate chip cookies were good before? You must try this recipe. Definitely a crowd pleaser.

Encouraging writing skills: Boys edition

It’s a common misconception that boys are better at math and girls are better at writing and language arts. This popular belief, according to developmental psychologists actually has no basis in reality, but is more of a reflection of the beliefs and teaching of society.

These days, teachers and parents of girls are often encouraged to allow their girls the same math and science play opportunities boys have, because there’s no genetic predisposition to disliking bugs or engineering.

But what can parents of boys do to ensure that they are encouraging writing skills for their son in language arts and communication?

One increasingly popular category of children’s literature has emerged for “reluctant readers” and it’s often called “The gross-out book.”  By appealing to a boy’s enthusiasm for passing gas and other bodily functions, these books appeal to a child’s sense of the taboo.  Luckily, most boys have other interests that parents can appeal to, in case they’re more interested in helping their sons develop a social awareness that extends beyond the idea that “Everybody Poops.”

Homeschoolers and other educators remind us that children’s interests can often be used as a gateway for other learning. Put another way, it isn’t necessary to “make learning fun” because learning is already fun. For boys who enjoy playing video games, there are gamer magazines and websites with plenty of cheats and playing advice to help turn a reluctant reader into an eager reader.  It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to see that “Hop on Pop” is far less interesting to an 8 yr old boy than “Six tricks for Minecraft world domination.” The lesson here is for parents to find written materials that support the child’s interests instead of boring him to tears.

Another tool for helping boys harness their literary skills is a nice set of boys stationery.  Parents can use stationary as a learning tool by packing notes in lunch boxes and leaving notes throughout the house.  Making a habit of leaving scavenger-hunt-like clues can be fun for kids to decode especially when there’s a prize at the end.  Parents who are in the habit of leaving notes are illustrating the practical aspects of written communication and giving their son reasons to write.  Finding pleasure in written communication can be the difference between “I don’t want to do my writing homework” and “Hey Mom, did I spell Disneyland correctly?”

Some educational reform advocates are concerned that kids are being taught the mechanics of reading and writing at the expense of their enthusiasm. When a child is interested in something and excited about it, it’s difficult to keep them from learning more. One of the best things a parent can do to help their children succeed in reading and writing is to model the importance of communication and provide the child with the tools to use it in his or her life.

Check out our selection of boys stationery to help your little guy embrace his passion for the written word.

Not enough room, but an abundance of toys

Have you ever gone into your kid’s bedrooms—or playrooms—and wondered where the floor went? Dolls, Legos, puzzles, hot wheels cars—there are so many toys all over the place that it looks like a typhoon hit the room! Maybe, until that very moment, you never realized how many toys your kids actually had. But this is a great incentive to do something about the clutter and organize your kid’s abundance of toys. You could even get your children to help you!

Arrange into Groups

Separate all of your child’s toys into different categories. For example: dolls, building blocks, action figures, reading items, cooking materials and outdoor toys are just a few good category names. Any accessories—like doll clothes—could be kept with the items so they won’t get lost. Outside toys should be kept in the garage or basement away from the inside toys.

Books, movies or CDs should be stored on accessible shelves in their bedroom or playroom. Why not sort them by age and give each of your children their own shelf? If you and your kids borrow books from your local library, be sure to allocate a shelf for that as well so that the borrowed items don’t get lost or mixed up with the books your kids own.

Reachable Storage

You should provide shelves, hooks and storage places for your kids to gain access to which will not only make it easy for them to pick up their toys, but encourage them to do so. Start out by buying a toy box or you could convert a big, plastic tote which makes a terrific toy box. The larger toys will fit perfectly in a toy box and allows for simple clean-up by your children.

Stuffed animals and other bulky, but light, objects can be pulled up off of the floor and put into mesh fabric that could be hung on the walls. The toys and animals will be seen but out of the way. To store smaller stuffed animals or dolls, a shoe holder is a clever idea and it can be hung anywhere that your child is able to reach.

Toys that have tiny parts like puzzles, building blocks or Legos may be put away in transparent, plastic bins with lids; if your child is at a reading age, you could also label each bin as to its contents. Likewise, wooden wine racks are terrific storage areas and can be found at any local thrift store or garage sale; many used wine racks are just like new! Use cylinder containers—like a Pringles potato chip can—and fill it with tiny cars or other little items; then place the full cylinders into the wooden wine rack cubbyholes.

If your little ones like to play dress-up chests, old dressers or trunks are wonderful storage for old clothes and accessories. Sift through your own hats, purses and clothes in your closets—maybe there’s something you could throw in the “Dress-up Box”!

For those miscellaneous things that don’t really have a home in any category, utilize wicker or plastic laundry baskets.

Toy Library

What is a toy library, you ask? Well, it’s a toy co-operative that’s a lot like a regular library except that you take out toys instead of books. A toy co-operative buys durable, top-quality, hand-made wooden toys from a senior’s workshop and non-profit agencies for the mentally impaired. There’s a small annual fee that you have to pay to belong to a toy library; when you pay the fee you and your children are allowed to go in and pick out toys such as trucks, games, cars, gorgeous puzzles—there are all kinds of toys to choose from for young kids!

If there isn’t a toy library in your community, maybe you and your neighborhood families could start one. The children will love being able to select and play with new toys every two weeks—and the kids may even get to play with something you might otherwise not have been able to afford to buy for them.

Art Area

There isn’t a youngster out there that doesn’t like to paint or draw. If you have the space in your child’s playroom, set up an easel so they can let their imagination run wild! But what do you do with all the paints and art supplies when they’re not in use? A bathroom, wall or floor cabinet is a good choice that can be kept or hung in the same area as the easel or in a separate room like the basement or laundry room. If you purchase a wall cabinet, be sure you hang it at a height that can be easily reached by your children. Keep items like colored pencils, crayons, paper, finger paints as well as other art supplies on the enclosed shelves of the cabinet. Inform your children that when they’re done in the art area, you expect them to clean up the mess and all of the items they use to be put back in the cabinet.

Kids need to learn how to properly care for their possessions and you can not only teach them how but be a good example for them by treating your own belongings with care. Just like almost every other item in your home, toys occasionally need to be wiped down with a damp cloth. You should show your children how to do this properly so they won’t ruin their toys.

Always remember, in this case, less is more. Your children will learn to cherish their toys and belongings if they have only a few of them. Set up a frequent “sort and purge” day—maybe once a month or so—and help them go through their toys. Urge your kids to give away to charity the toys they don’t play with or use anymore.

One last thing, if you started teaching your children at an early age to pick up after themselves, chances are they’ll clean their playroom all on their own. But if you haven’t, then now is the time to teach them to pick up their toys and other belongings. It’ll teach them to be responsible as well as how to organize!

Amy Adele’s Easter

Happy Day After Easter! He is Risen Indeed!

All of us at Amy Adele hope you had a lovely Easter yesterday. After a rainy and cold Good Friday and Saturday, the sun came out and it was a gorgeous sunny warm day here in the Upstate of South Carolina. We were praising Jesus a little bit more than we normally do on Easter for the weather alone! 😉

On Easter morning we all woke early (but not really early like some of you sunrise folks) and went off to church to sing, worship and remember the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ! Then we scooted home quickly to get ready to celebrate some more with my in-laws (whom I love). It was my turn to host, which I was happy to do. When I was growing up, my parents always hosted the Easter meal, so it feels right when it’s my “turn”. 🙂 

I should back up a tad though. To prepare for it all,  I had a lot of fun this year decorating and getting the house ready. I like to keep things simple and sweet… but it doesn’t come naturally. I  take forever fiddling and thinking  through things to get it just right (or close enough). I think I may have drove my family a little crazy with all my home decor projects!

Easter Garden

Here is an Easter garden I created… but this one doesn’t have any dirt so I can store it for next year! I just used a little moss instead. Celebrating the death and resurrection of Jesus is the most important part of Easter for our family and I just really wanted a decoration that reminded us of this!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This wreath that’s now hanging in my kitchen was a very simple creation… I  just took a store bought wreath and added little Easter eggs.

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Here are a few shots of my dining room… all decked out in its finest Easter flare. I had so much fun finding candle sticks, vases, platters and such around the house to create a little spring garden. I cut those branches from my trees in the backyard. My neighbors were probably wondering why I was running in and out of the house (in the rain) on Saturday holding branches and leaves! 🙂

easter-decorcrosstable

 

My husband and I made some big diet changes on January 1st of this year and it’s been such a success that we’re sticking to it! So the macaroni and cheese dish and a few others like it, got cut from the line up. Of course, not everyone in the family is eating like us so Uncle Jon brought over some yummy bread (that I must admit I ate a tiny piece of). 🙂 I’m not a chef but I found a simple healthy recipe for asparagus risotto that I thought I’d try. As I began putting it together Aunt Chris and Uncle Jon (who are very good Italian cooks) kept commenting on how they’ve never made risotto because they heard its quite tricky. My “simple little recipe” quickly changed to an intimidating one as 13 people hovered in the kitchen waiting to eat. Yikes! But in the end it turned out ok. Whew!! Here’s a picture of me and my sweet mother-in-law as I stir stir my risotto (I quickly learned that lots of stirring was required).

Easter-risotto

 

 

We finished the afternoon off with my mother-in-law’s beautiful 3 layer lemon cake that was amazing! (Did I just admit to eating that too?) Also, my 10 year old daughter created a scavenger/egg hunt for the older cousins who are in high school and college. It was a hoot watching the older ones running around instead of the younger ones this year!

Family Easter pictures are a must. This tradition dates back quite sometime for my family. This is a photo of my grandparents and my father on Easter Sunday, March 28, 1948 in Washington DC taken with the national cherry blossoms as their backdrop. We don’t have very many photos of them so we think its kinda neat that this event and Corban’s birthday were both on March 28th!

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Now, sixty six years later here is a photo me and my sweet family on Easter 2014.

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Not every day is heavenly but I’m thrilled to say this one was pretty close!

Writing: Why children’s stationery is important

One reason for giving personalized children’s stationery is to help motivate children to do their best possible writing. The ability to write well, especially in social settings, is one that is seldom gets enough time to develop fully in schools because of the sheer volume of other information and skills to be mastered. That is a shame because the ability to communicate graciously on paper enriches life greatly over the years.

However, it is not hard to teach the basics of social writing with just a little know-how. Believe it or not, some of the best advice for teaching the basics of writing comes from Benjamin Franklin, in his Autobiography. His method boils down to imitation – not surprisingly, as this is one of the ways children learn naturally. In his own case, he took an “odd volume of the Spectator” and found he “thought the writing excellent, and wished, if possible, to imitate it.”

Franklin records that he read some of the papers and made short notes of the main idea in each sentence. He then set the original book aside and “try’d to compleat the papers again, by expressing each hinted sentiment at length, and as fully as it had been expressed before, in any suitable words that should come to hand.”

After doing this he compared his own work with the original, “discovered many faults and amended them” and often “had the pleasure of fancying that, in certain particulars of small import, I had been lucky enough to improve the method or the language, and this encouraged me to think I might possibly in time come to be a tolerable English writer.”

You can modify Franklin’s method to suit your child’s ability. Simply write a sample note using the form you’d like your child to use, a kind of template to be followed. Then have your child write the same number of sentences with each sentence modeled on the one in your example, making changes to personalize the note. When the note is complete look back and read both notes aloud, compare the changes made to the original, and point out improvements. This method of using a template works particularly well with thank you notes, children’s stationery,  or greeting cards sent out on vacation.

As your child gains experience it is natural to make each note a bit more advanced, until your child easily writes notes independently. The process of checking the new work against the original allows the child to see exactly where improvement is happening and builds confidence and enjoyment of the process. You can be assured that every step along the way helps your child prepare for a lifetime of enjoyable communication.

5 Tips To Give A Birthday Experience Instead Of A Traditional Party

We’ve all seen it…the pile of gifts at a traditional children’s birthday party.  It is exciting at the time, but ask them in six months what they received and most won’t remember.  However, take them to that event they have always wanted to go to and they will surely remember it.  In a world where “stuff” seems to overwhelm our lives, consider giving the gift of an experience this year instead of a traditional party.  Make a memory with your child they won’t soon forget.

  1. Setting a budget…just like a birthday party, birthday experiences can be provided at any budgetary level.  Make sure you consider not only the cost of the tickets (for sporting events, concerts or theme parks for example), but also food and any other souvenirs you are willing to purchase.
  2. Choosing the experience…every child is different, professional sports events might top the list of some, while others may want to visit a theme park or new museum they haven’t been to yet.  Others may simply want an over-night stay at a hotel with a pool or to see the professional ballet or symphony.  A ride in a helicopter or a limousine might be what other kids have always wanted to do.  Decide whether you will offer choices to your child or select it for them.
  3. Inviting friends…depending on the experience and your budget, you may be able to invite a few friends to go with your child on their experience.  Having someone to share an experience with can not only increase enjoyment but also help create even more special memories for your child.
  4. Giving other gifts…just because you are giving an experience doesn’t mean a traditional gift is not possible.  Consider giving a gift that coordinates with the experience or maybe something to help time pass on the trip if there is a long car ride to the experience.  A new baseball glove if you are going to a baseball game, new tennis shoes if the event requires a lot of walking, maybe let them chose a souvenir from the gift shop or a camera to take pictures during the experience.
  5. Making it special…Birthdays are all about having a special day for your child.  Send invitations if inviting others for the experience.  Make a paper announcement or special certificate to detail the experience for your child.  Consider ordering a special dessert or maybe bringing a cake to the experience.  Give a t-shirt or hat as a party favor if it fits into your budget.

Memories last a lifetime.  Give your child an experience they won’t forget this year.

How to write a fundraising letter: Tips and Tricks

Writing a fund raising letter can be both frustrating and stressful. How do you write a letter that inspires donations and support without coming off rude or begging. Learning how to write a fundraising letter can be very simple. It takes some research and practice!

There are several things that need to be kept in mind when preparing to write your letter: the goal (what are you looking to achieve), why is it necessary, how can they donate. In addition to considering these things, there is also the writing of the actual letter.

Here are some tips and tricks for writing a perfect fundraising letter!

Tips for the beginning of your letter:

  1. Eye catching introduction – you need to grab the reader’s attention right from the beginning. Questions, personal stories, something that will truly capture what you are hoping to achieve.
  2. Mention what previous donations accomplished. People like to see the results of their assistance.
  3. Focus on a specific goal. People want to know exactly what their money is going towards and what the end result will hopefully be.
  4. Be polite! Thank them for their time, remind them that it is only through their support can this goal be successful

The request:

  1. Before asking for donations, make sure to fully explain the activity, event, cause, goal, etc.
  2. Don’t beg or demand a certain donation, instead offer different options if possible.
  3. Describe what will happen if the donations aren’t received.

Ending the letter:

  1. Thank the reader for their time and support.
  2. Remind them why their assistance is so important and appreciated.

Additional Considerations:

Remember that not everyone might be familiar with the program if it isn’t a new one. If it is a new program more explanations might be necessary. Make sure to check grammar and spelling. Incorrect spelling and poor grammar can give your cause a bad image. Consider leaving contact information incase anyone has any questions or concerns. Most of all take your time to ensure you are representing the situation to the best of your ability.

Follow these tips and tricks and your fundraising letters can only improve!

Halloween Group Costume Ideas

Group Costume Ideas

Halloween will be here soon, and if you don’t have a costume yet it’s time to do some serious brainstorming. The best things about Halloween are dressing up and being with your friends and family; and it’s especially enjoyable to combine the two. If this year’s Halloween plans include a party or outing with others, consider one of these group costume ideas.

Costume Ideas for Families

  • Star Wars: Star Wars has created a fan base which spans generations, making it an ideal theme for family Halloween outfits. Mom and Dad make are perfect as Han and Leia, Darth Vader and Stormtrooper or Anakin and Padme while the little ones can dress as Chewbacca, Yoda, Ewoks, Stormtroopers or Jedi Knights.
  • Farmers with farm animals: Trick-or-Treat with the cows and pigs this All Hallow’s Eve. Parents can dress-up as farmers with their young animals in tow, getting their treat bags filled with goodies. Alternatively, switch it around and have the kids dress as farmers while Mom and Dad transform into sheep, goats, horses or other barnyard friends.
  • Monsters Inc.: Monster’s Inc. is hot right now so there is no shortage of ideas for dressing up like your favorite furry (or slimy) Monster’s character. While Sulley and Mike seem like the classic choice for Mom and Dad and Boo for their little girl, you might decide to mix it up a bit and don the kids in costumes like Mike, Sulley or any of the other loveable monsters from the cast while Mom and Dad dress as Roz and Mr. Waternoose, or from Monsters University, Don Carlton and Ms. Squibbles. Or dress the whole family in green “OK” shirts and hats and go as the Oozma Kappa clan.
  • Toy Story: Toy Story is another classic animated film from which a multitude of entertaining costume inspirations has come. Buzz, Jessie, Woody, Mr. Potato Head and the rest are simple and fun attire for a Trick-or-Treating expedition or not-so-frightening family parties.

Costume Ideas for Young Kids

  • Peanuts Gang: Young kids still love Snoopy and the Gang. The whole neighborhood will adore your little ones if they dress up as Peanuts characters for their Halloween “Tricks-or-Treats”; just hope no one gets a rock.
  • Disney Princesses: Little girls still dream of being a princess. Their wish will be granted this Halloween when your daughter and her friends dress up as Cinderella, Snow White, Belle and their other favorite Disney Princesses.
  • Pirates: Pirate costumes are perfect for boys and girls of all ages. Let your kids have a grand adventure this Halloween dressed as a crew of swashbuckling buccaneers.
  • Multiple colors of Crayons: What a great group costume! The little ones will be especially excited to dress as their favorite Crayon shade. Be creative with colors; think the 64 Crayon box.
  • Wizard of Oz: Dress the youngsters as the Tin Man, Cowardly Lion, Scarecrow, Dorothy and even Toto this Halloween in homage to this timeless family film.

Group Costume Ideas for Any Age

Getting your friends to dress up with you in a group costume will be a breeze, everyone knows and loves these costume ideas!

  • Video Game Characters: From Pokémon to Angry Birds to the Mario Brothers, video game characters are cool and easily recognizable; making them fantastic options for Halloween attire.
  • Alice in Wonderland: Spend this Halloween in Wonderland with your favorite players from this classic book and movie.
  • 1950s: Groups of boys and girls, or men and women, can go to the Sock Hop in the characteristic style of the 50’s when they dress-up in leather jackets and poodle skirts.
  • Zombies: Spooky costumes are the quintessential in All Hallow’s Eve attire, and Zombies are at the top of the list. Zombie costumes are simple to make or are easily found in Halloween stores and online.
  • Super Heroes: Almost everyone wants to be like Superman, Batman, Spiderman or Wonder Woman. Hit the town with your crowd dressed as your favorite super heroes.
  • Harry Potter: Ron, Harry, Hermione and the rest of the Harry Potter gang have been Halloween favorites for over a decade, and this year is no exception.

 

This Halloween skip the same old boring costume. Become the center of attention when your friends, family and kids get together and dress in hilarious, witty, creepy or just plain fun group costume. Check out Amy Adele for great Halloween party invitations, labels, thank you notes and more!

Halloween Party: Group Costume
This invitation is perfect for inviting your friends to come dressed as whatever they’d like or as a group costume. Just remember to remind them what the group costume is!