Tag Archives: Kids

Nine Wonderful Children’s Wintry Party Themes

The winter months are quickly approaching and a children’s birthday party that lands during those months is challenging to plan. But if you use some creativity, each season offers lots of potentially fun activities or themes which will make any party special. Yes, wintertime is just full of great children’s wintry party themes!

A Winter Carnival

Make up games that children would play at a fair or carnival but use a winter theme. You could set up stations for different games. For instance, establish a booth with tin cans lined up on the edge of a table and have the children try to knock them down by propelling a snowball at the cans. You could let the children have sledding races or create stations for snowball bowling. Hand out prizes to the winners that are fitting of a carnival like a stuffed animal and, since it’s a carnival, make sure to serve fun carnival food like pretzels, cotton candy, popcorn and hot chocolate.

A Snowman Competition

This could end up being one of the best activities! Split the kids into even teams and place the teams at different locations in your yard. This might be a good activity for the front yard—providing you have the space—and you can get a jump on decorating for Christmas at the same time! Old accessories and clothing should be collected ahead of time to supply the kids with something to clothe their snowman. After all, there’s nothing worse than a naked snowman! Also, don’t forget about supplying them with carrots, raisins or berries and sticks for noses, eyes, mouths and arms—what’s a snowman without a face? You and other parents should stand by as judges and, when everyone is finished with their snowman, pick the best one and present the winning team with some kind of an award. Snowballs, a snowman pizza and a snowman ice cream cake make tasty treats to serve inside to hungry children after all the excitement.

Snow Castle Party

Who says you need sand and sunshine to make a castle? That white stuff in your back—or front—yard can turn out to be an asset. Throw a snow castle constructing party! At this party, kids should come all bundled up and ready to spend lots of time outside using plastic toy shovels, beach pails and different kinds of carving tools to make a castle out of snow. You can have the children work together to make one big castle or make it into a competition between two teams—either way, the kids are sure to have a blast! When the fun outdoors is finished, bring the kids indoors to warm up with some delicious chili or soup and hot chocolate; but don’t forget those marshmallows! Snow white frosting and flaked coconut will make a great wintery topping for just about any dessert.

Winter Olympics

Arrange competitions and games for kids to enjoy that are built on ideas from the winter Olympic events. Put together events of snowshoe racing, snowball throwing contests and snow mound jumping, just to name a few. Be sure to have a different award for first, second and third place winners for each event. Decorations should be set to the theme of the winter Olympics—draw the Olympic rings in the snow in your back yard and use food coloring to show off the Olympic ring colors. You can also hang up paper torches inside your house and the birthday cake should be red, white and blue.

Winter Pool Party

Why should a few inches of snow stop the children from enjoying one of summer’s best activities? Indoor pools render the chance for kids to swim, splash and celebrate in a regulated climate while the weather outdoors may be frigid. You may be able to rent a pool in a community center, hotel or fitness center and decorations can be left to the imagination. You could just have tropical-colored decorations to symbolize summer. But wouldn’t it be fun to have the best of both seasons? Purchase inflatable palm trees and decorate them with paper snowflakes. How about snowflake-printed towels lain over lawn chairs? The cake could be a large swimming pool with polar bear figurines on top.

Ice Skating

Bring the children to a safe skating lake or pond for the party or rent an ice rink for a few hours. If you choose to rent an ice rink, you’ll need to rent one four to six weeks in advance; be sure to ask about package deals and if you can bring in food from home. You’ll want to have parents nearby that are good skaters so that they can help the kids that don’t know how to ice skate. Play some fun, upbeat music and let the children free-skate. Integrate a few games such as a skating version of red light/green light. The birthday child stands in front of the rest of the children but a little bit of distance away with his or her back toward them. When the child says, “green light” the rest of the kids will start to skate ahead; when the child says, “red light” and turns around, all the children have to be stopped. If the birthday child catches anyone moving forward then that person has to go back to the starting line. The first child to tag the birthday child wins the game and then takes their turn in that spot. For decorations you could hang up icicles, paper ice skates and snowflakes around the rink. If you got a package deal, hot dogs or pizza usually is included. The cake could be in the form of an icy pond with figure skaters adorning the top or in the shape of an ice skate.

Snowflake Ball

Although snow may get old for adults as the season wears on, for children the magic never fades. For this type of party, rent a banquet hall and decorate it with icicle lights and snowflakes dangling over their heads while they’re on the dance floor. Use synthetic snow and sparkles to create a wintery invitation in the entryway. For the table, purchase shimmering white and blue place settings on a snowflake tablecloth. An artificial snow making machine and ice sculptures would be an enhancement to the magical feel of the party. You can’t forget the entertainment! Make sure to have some party games that are suitable for the snowflake party such as Snowflake Trivia. Get several adults to write winter or Christmas trivia questions on paper cut-out snowflakes—one question per snowflake. Then each child pulls a snowflake out of a bowl and tries to answer the question; the child who answers the most questions wins. Or you could hire someone to give basic ballroom dance lessons. For the menu, snowflake cookies, white hot chocolate, a tray of veggie and cheese pieces that are cut into snowflakes and a snowflake cake would be a hit.

Snow Sculpting

Snow sculpting is a lot of fun and what child wouldn’t love to do this? Hand out to each child a portion of snow to use. Make up ahead of time a box full of “props” that the kids can pick from to adorn their sculpture with. Items could include: masks, boas, beads, sunglasses, flowers, leaves and rocks. Pick a time limit—say, an hour—and let the children develop their best sculpture during that time frame. Take a vote to confirm a winner in several different categories like “best executed”, “most creative” and “best over-all”. For the cake, you could have one specially made that looks like an ice sculpture!

Penguin Party

Just about all children love animals and who doesn’t love penguins? They’re so cute and would make a great party theme! Decorating can be very simple: white and black streamers and balloons hung on the walls and ceiling of the party room and you could buy a penguin-printed tablecloth with black place settings and white napkins. If you want an extra touch, place some plush penguins of different sizes around the room. Entertaining the kids will be just as easy as decorating. You can show them a movie like “Happy Feet” or “Mr. Popper’s Penguins”, give them a penguin craft to make and play some standard games in which the children will have to imitate the penguin like penguin waddle relay races. The kids will absolutely love your penguin cupcakes cake!

Whether you’re trying to get rid of those winter blues or planning a birthday party, one of these winter party themes are sure to be a hit. You’ll want to check out our great website for everything you’ll need for your party!

Encouraging writing skills: Boys edition

It’s a common misconception that boys are better at math and girls are better at writing and language arts. This popular belief, according to developmental psychologists actually has no basis in reality, but is more of a reflection of the beliefs and teaching of society.

These days, teachers and parents of girls are often encouraged to allow their girls the same math and science play opportunities boys have, because there’s no genetic predisposition to disliking bugs or engineering.

But what can parents of boys do to ensure that they are encouraging writing skills for their son in language arts and communication?

One increasingly popular category of children’s literature has emerged for “reluctant readers” and it’s often called “The gross-out book.”  By appealing to a boy’s enthusiasm for passing gas and other bodily functions, these books appeal to a child’s sense of the taboo.  Luckily, most boys have other interests that parents can appeal to, in case they’re more interested in helping their sons develop a social awareness that extends beyond the idea that “Everybody Poops.”

Homeschoolers and other educators remind us that children’s interests can often be used as a gateway for other learning. Put another way, it isn’t necessary to “make learning fun” because learning is already fun. For boys who enjoy playing video games, there are gamer magazines and websites with plenty of cheats and playing advice to help turn a reluctant reader into an eager reader.  It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to see that “Hop on Pop” is far less interesting to an 8 yr old boy than “Six tricks for Minecraft world domination.” The lesson here is for parents to find written materials that support the child’s interests instead of boring him to tears.

Another tool for helping boys harness their literary skills is a nice set of boys stationery.  Parents can use stationary as a learning tool by packing notes in lunch boxes and leaving notes throughout the house.  Making a habit of leaving scavenger-hunt-like clues can be fun for kids to decode especially when there’s a prize at the end.  Parents who are in the habit of leaving notes are illustrating the practical aspects of written communication and giving their son reasons to write.  Finding pleasure in written communication can be the difference between “I don’t want to do my writing homework” and “Hey Mom, did I spell Disneyland correctly?”

Some educational reform advocates are concerned that kids are being taught the mechanics of reading and writing at the expense of their enthusiasm. When a child is interested in something and excited about it, it’s difficult to keep them from learning more. One of the best things a parent can do to help their children succeed in reading and writing is to model the importance of communication and provide the child with the tools to use it in his or her life.

Check out our selection of boys stationery to help your little guy embrace his passion for the written word.

Not enough room, but an abundance of toys

Have you ever gone into your kid’s bedrooms—or playrooms—and wondered where the floor went? Dolls, Legos, puzzles, hot wheels cars—there are so many toys all over the place that it looks like a typhoon hit the room! Maybe, until that very moment, you never realized how many toys your kids actually had. But this is a great incentive to do something about the clutter and organize your kid’s abundance of toys. You could even get your children to help you!

Arrange into Groups

Separate all of your child’s toys into different categories. For example: dolls, building blocks, action figures, reading items, cooking materials and outdoor toys are just a few good category names. Any accessories—like doll clothes—could be kept with the items so they won’t get lost. Outside toys should be kept in the garage or basement away from the inside toys.

Books, movies or CDs should be stored on accessible shelves in their bedroom or playroom. Why not sort them by age and give each of your children their own shelf? If you and your kids borrow books from your local library, be sure to allocate a shelf for that as well so that the borrowed items don’t get lost or mixed up with the books your kids own.

Reachable Storage

You should provide shelves, hooks and storage places for your kids to gain access to which will not only make it easy for them to pick up their toys, but encourage them to do so. Start out by buying a toy box or you could convert a big, plastic tote which makes a terrific toy box. The larger toys will fit perfectly in a toy box and allows for simple clean-up by your children.

Stuffed animals and other bulky, but light, objects can be pulled up off of the floor and put into mesh fabric that could be hung on the walls. The toys and animals will be seen but out of the way. To store smaller stuffed animals or dolls, a shoe holder is a clever idea and it can be hung anywhere that your child is able to reach.

Toys that have tiny parts like puzzles, building blocks or Legos may be put away in transparent, plastic bins with lids; if your child is at a reading age, you could also label each bin as to its contents. Likewise, wooden wine racks are terrific storage areas and can be found at any local thrift store or garage sale; many used wine racks are just like new! Use cylinder containers—like a Pringles potato chip can—and fill it with tiny cars or other little items; then place the full cylinders into the wooden wine rack cubbyholes.

If your little ones like to play dress-up chests, old dressers or trunks are wonderful storage for old clothes and accessories. Sift through your own hats, purses and clothes in your closets—maybe there’s something you could throw in the “Dress-up Box”!

For those miscellaneous things that don’t really have a home in any category, utilize wicker or plastic laundry baskets.

Toy Library

What is a toy library, you ask? Well, it’s a toy co-operative that’s a lot like a regular library except that you take out toys instead of books. A toy co-operative buys durable, top-quality, hand-made wooden toys from a senior’s workshop and non-profit agencies for the mentally impaired. There’s a small annual fee that you have to pay to belong to a toy library; when you pay the fee you and your children are allowed to go in and pick out toys such as trucks, games, cars, gorgeous puzzles—there are all kinds of toys to choose from for young kids!

If there isn’t a toy library in your community, maybe you and your neighborhood families could start one. The children will love being able to select and play with new toys every two weeks—and the kids may even get to play with something you might otherwise not have been able to afford to buy for them.

Art Area

There isn’t a youngster out there that doesn’t like to paint or draw. If you have the space in your child’s playroom, set up an easel so they can let their imagination run wild! But what do you do with all the paints and art supplies when they’re not in use? A bathroom, wall or floor cabinet is a good choice that can be kept or hung in the same area as the easel or in a separate room like the basement or laundry room. If you purchase a wall cabinet, be sure you hang it at a height that can be easily reached by your children. Keep items like colored pencils, crayons, paper, finger paints as well as other art supplies on the enclosed shelves of the cabinet. Inform your children that when they’re done in the art area, you expect them to clean up the mess and all of the items they use to be put back in the cabinet.

Kids need to learn how to properly care for their possessions and you can not only teach them how but be a good example for them by treating your own belongings with care. Just like almost every other item in your home, toys occasionally need to be wiped down with a damp cloth. You should show your children how to do this properly so they won’t ruin their toys.

Always remember, in this case, less is more. Your children will learn to cherish their toys and belongings if they have only a few of them. Set up a frequent “sort and purge” day—maybe once a month or so—and help them go through their toys. Urge your kids to give away to charity the toys they don’t play with or use anymore.

One last thing, if you started teaching your children at an early age to pick up after themselves, chances are they’ll clean their playroom all on their own. But if you haven’t, then now is the time to teach them to pick up their toys and other belongings. It’ll teach them to be responsible as well as how to organize!

The Girls of Amy Adele

If you follow our blog you know a lot about Amy’s son Corban. He unintentionally became the spotlight of conversation due to his early arrival and miraculous growth, but we think it is time to share a little more about his older sisters! Here’s what you need to know about the girls of Amy Adele.

Family Picnic

Emily is Amy’s oldest daughter and Corban’s best friend.

Emily and Corban at the grocery store

 

She is 15 and learning to drive, which is a big step, not only for her but for Amy and Joe as well. Emily is very active. She loves ice skating and even teaches skating lessons! Emily also runs cross country competitively. School comes easy for her. She also helps Amy teach a 3rd grade class at their church. In her spare time she doodles and draws just like Amy! With all of her activities and teaching you would probably imagine her as the outspoken and extroverted one of the family. It’s surprising to know that she is actually the most quiet and reserved.

Emily in the hammock

So, who is the extrovert? That would be Grace.

Gracie making pancakes

Grace turns 11 on June 5th, and she is “silly, silly, silly” according to Amy. School comes easy for her as well. Grace is the creative spirit in the house, she is always drawing, playing piano, and even writing her own songs. Her second love to being a musical genius? Her collection of her beloved stuffed animals of course. She has no filter; if she thinks it she says it! She is outspoken, friendly, and giggly. Grace is always happy!

Gracie going out of town

Emily and Grace are best buds and they love each other a ton! They love to hang out in Emily’s hammock that she hangs up in the back yard and Amy will often find them chatting away up in their rooms. They also give Amy great advice when she is designing a new card! Their constant creativity and contrasting personalities fill the Wike home with life and love!

Writing: Why children’s stationery is important

One reason for giving personalized children’s stationery is to help motivate children to do their best possible writing. The ability to write well, especially in social settings, is one that is seldom gets enough time to develop fully in schools because of the sheer volume of other information and skills to be mastered. That is a shame because the ability to communicate graciously on paper enriches life greatly over the years.

However, it is not hard to teach the basics of social writing with just a little know-how. Believe it or not, some of the best advice for teaching the basics of writing comes from Benjamin Franklin, in his Autobiography. His method boils down to imitation – not surprisingly, as this is one of the ways children learn naturally. In his own case, he took an “odd volume of the Spectator” and found he “thought the writing excellent, and wished, if possible, to imitate it.”

Franklin records that he read some of the papers and made short notes of the main idea in each sentence. He then set the original book aside and “try’d to compleat the papers again, by expressing each hinted sentiment at length, and as fully as it had been expressed before, in any suitable words that should come to hand.”

After doing this he compared his own work with the original, “discovered many faults and amended them” and often “had the pleasure of fancying that, in certain particulars of small import, I had been lucky enough to improve the method or the language, and this encouraged me to think I might possibly in time come to be a tolerable English writer.”

You can modify Franklin’s method to suit your child’s ability. Simply write a sample note using the form you’d like your child to use, a kind of template to be followed. Then have your child write the same number of sentences with each sentence modeled on the one in your example, making changes to personalize the note. When the note is complete look back and read both notes aloud, compare the changes made to the original, and point out improvements. This method of using a template works particularly well with thank you notes, children’s stationery,  or greeting cards sent out on vacation.

As your child gains experience it is natural to make each note a bit more advanced, until your child easily writes notes independently. The process of checking the new work against the original allows the child to see exactly where improvement is happening and builds confidence and enjoyment of the process. You can be assured that every step along the way helps your child prepare for a lifetime of enjoyable communication.

5 Tips To Give A Birthday Experience Instead Of A Traditional Party

We’ve all seen it…the pile of gifts at a traditional children’s birthday party.  It is exciting at the time, but ask them in six months what they received and most won’t remember.  However, take them to that event they have always wanted to go to and they will surely remember it.  In a world where “stuff” seems to overwhelm our lives, consider giving the gift of an experience this year instead of a traditional party.  Make a memory with your child they won’t soon forget.

  1. Setting a budget…just like a birthday party, birthday experiences can be provided at any budgetary level.  Make sure you consider not only the cost of the tickets (for sporting events, concerts or theme parks for example), but also food and any other souvenirs you are willing to purchase.
  2. Choosing the experience…every child is different, professional sports events might top the list of some, while others may want to visit a theme park or new museum they haven’t been to yet.  Others may simply want an over-night stay at a hotel with a pool or to see the professional ballet or symphony.  A ride in a helicopter or a limousine might be what other kids have always wanted to do.  Decide whether you will offer choices to your child or select it for them.
  3. Inviting friends…depending on the experience and your budget, you may be able to invite a few friends to go with your child on their experience.  Having someone to share an experience with can not only increase enjoyment but also help create even more special memories for your child.
  4. Giving other gifts…just because you are giving an experience doesn’t mean a traditional gift is not possible.  Consider giving a gift that coordinates with the experience or maybe something to help time pass on the trip if there is a long car ride to the experience.  A new baseball glove if you are going to a baseball game, new tennis shoes if the event requires a lot of walking, maybe let them chose a souvenir from the gift shop or a camera to take pictures during the experience.
  5. Making it special…Birthdays are all about having a special day for your child.  Send invitations if inviting others for the experience.  Make a paper announcement or special certificate to detail the experience for your child.  Consider ordering a special dessert or maybe bringing a cake to the experience.  Give a t-shirt or hat as a party favor if it fits into your budget.

Memories last a lifetime.  Give your child an experience they won’t forget this year.

Today is Corban’s 5th Birthday!

Today, our little man turns 5! Let’s take a look at Corban’s Journey!

Corban’s arrival 2 months early was a very scary moment for the whole Amy Adele family. He weighed only 2 lbs 3 oz but Corban quickly showed the world that he would be a fighter!

corban

At 2 weeks old Corban weighed just under 3 lbs. To give you some prospective, a bag of coffee beans weighs about 3 lbs! Corban came home on April 30th 2009 at one month and 2 days old. Amy was a little nervous bringing home such a little guy, but the whole family was ecstatic to have their little miracle home and thankful that the first big hurdle for Corban was over.

corbubb500

Over the next year Corban grew and functioned like any other newborn. He even got a little chubby! (See picture below for chunky cheeked baby awesomeness!)

corban-frog-shirt-small

Corban tackled other hurdles with ease! Going to physical therapy and wearing his helmet didn’t keep him from big smiles and giggles! This picture was taken on his first birthday!

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At 20 months Corban took his first steps on November 9th 2010. Amy has been in chase mode ever since!

When-will-Corban-walk

Corban tackled walking and continued to grow and change, slowly but surely.

Let’s fast forward a bit….

Here is Corban at 3 years old. He is smaller than other 3 year old’s, and developmentally is currently somewhere between 1 1/2 and 2 years old.  As all preschoolers do, he gave Amy and her husband plenty of practice at patience!

blog-stroller

Now, let’s jump forward to today! (Because I am too excited and can’t wait anymore!)

Today is Corban’s 5th birthday! That’s a BIG milestone for a little man! He loves all things wheel related! Motorcycles are his favorite!

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Corban is still small for his age, and continues to face some obstacles developmentally. He is in currently in K4 but is not quite ready for kindergarten next year. He will be in K4 again next year to make sure he’s extra ready! 🙂 The Amy Adele family has learned a lot from Corban! He is teaching us to just take our time with him and that keeps us on our toes! Thanks, from our family to yours, for celebrating Corban’s big day with us!

Family Activities For The Holiday Season

If you are preparing to host a house full of family and friends this holiday season chances are football will be on the television and kids will be under foot. However this special time should be celebrated by talking, laughing and having fun instead of television and time-outs. It’s time to start planning some holiday activities that are sure to keep everyone occupied and entertained while dinner is in the oven.

Family Football Game

Nothing is more fun on a crisp autumn day than a football game with the entire gang, and everyone can play flag football, even the little ones. Choose teams (make sure to even out the kids on both sides to make it fair), discuss the rules, hang “flags” from your back pockets and get the game going. Let your guests know in advance if you want to plan a football game; they’ll want to bring a change of clothes and some sneakers.

Table Games

If the weather keeps your holiday party indoors, consider setting up a few strategically placed board games on card and coffee tables throughout your living area. Chess, checkers and dominoes are simple two-person games that almost everyone can easily learn to play. Alternatively, invest in a Carrom board, table-top Foosball or Air Hockey table, and your party guests will enjoy lively and good-natured competition. Don’t forget to include games or puzzles for the younger children.

Kids Crafts

If space allows, set up a craft table for kids complete with everything they need to create a masterpiece. Paper, paint, pinecones, gourds and glue can become works of art in the creative hands of a 4-year-old, and a Christmas tree centerpiece or hand drawn place cards are the perfect extra touch for your Christmas table décor. Protect holiday outfits with old oversized t-shirts or artist aprons.

Put on a Skit

Children love to put on plays. Find a simple skit online, write one of your own or have the kids write one, and assign a character to each child who wants to participate. Ideas include a re-enactment of the first Christmas, using puppets to act out what they are thankful for or pretending they are a family of Christmas trees who live on a farm. Have a few, simple costume pieces on hand; adults can join in too. After the actors have practiced a bit, encourage the entire family to watch them perform.

This special time only comes once a year, so promote thankfulness this Holiday season by turning off the television and spending time together. Enjoy your company, your bountiful feast, and your day.

Amy Adele has great thank you notes. Your kids will love writing Thank You notes to grandma after Christmas. Or leave a note to your aunt thanking her for hosting your family!

Family Christmas Catus

Kids Thanksgiving Crafts

Brown paper bags are all you need to get started on great children’s crafts for Thanksgiving celebrating Native American culture. These are some ideas to get you started.

Materials:

Collect big brown paper bags while you’re doing your shopping at grocery and liquor stores or buy them online. Put together a variety of objects for decorations like buttons, beads, feathers, yarn and leather shoelaces. Then all you need is scissors, glue, magic markers and crayons.

Making and Enjoying Crafts:

You can make paper bags look like leather by soaking them in the sink or a large bowl of warm water for about ten minutes. Adding a cup of brown tempera paint will make the bag look more like cloth. Simple crafts include shields, vests, scrolls and blankets. For a shield, separate two bags along the seams and glue them together and cut out a circle shape. Vests can be fashioned by cutting a neck hole in the bottom of one bag with arm holes on the sides. For scrolls, cut out a rectangle and roll the edges around a stick on each side and glue them in place. A big bag or a roll of brown paper makes an easy blanket style tablecloth. Decorate your crafts with animal shapes or geometric designs. Cut the edges to make fringe. You can use the crafts for a separate party or let kids show them off at their own table on Thanksgiving Day.

Dining:

With so many different Native American tribes, there is no single authentic cuisine. Most kids will love a menu that draws on the Mesoamerican traditions behind today’s Mexican food. They’ll gain a new appreciation for the tortillas they already love, and they’ll be more likely to eat  their vegetables.

The kids table will look like the best seats in the house when you help the little ones design it themselves. Enter into the true spirit of Thanksgiving by remembering Native American culture and sharing activities with your loved ones.

Invite all your family and friends over for Thanksgiving Day with this great invitation. With all the details displayed wonderfully on this Thanksgiving inspired invitation, everyone will be on time! Visit http://www.amyadele.com/  to personalize yours today!

Invite your friends to a party full of crafts!

Travel Safety Tips For Holidays With Grandma

Nanny in the Clouds is a hiring service that gives parents peace of mind and helps you keep track of your kids before, during and after your trip home to see the parents. Call the service and it will connect you with a nanny who happens to be on your same flight, or it will arrange for one to meet you curbside to help you herd your family from plane to rental car to hotel.

Bumper-to-Bumper Safety

But what if you drive? No matter how you plan to get to grandma’s house, exercise several tips as you keep your kids safe. It’s not a musical instrument, but your vehicle’s thousands of parts need to work in harmony if you’re going to get your kids to grandma’s house safely. Spend a morning in your home garage or at the mechanic’s and tune up the car. Check the tire pressure, brakes and battery. You’ll also want to top off the fluids, replace worn windshield wipers and make sure the lights work properly. Make sure the child seats and belts work properly so that your children can stay securely and properly buckled in at all times.

A stocked emergency kit in your vehicle is another safety essential. Be prepared with the following:

  • First aid supplies
  • Emergency flares
  • Spare tire and jack
  • Jumper cables
  • Ice scraper
  • Small bag of kitty litter in case you encounter ice
  • Waterproof matches
  • Flashlight
  • Blankets
  • Bottled water and energy bars or dried fruit

Back-Seat Safety

A laptop, iPod or smartphone works wonders to keep your little ones entertained in the back seat so that you don’t hear your kids whine about the long drive and their annoying siblings. The American Academy of Pediatrics reports, that laptop-induced “erythema ab igne,” which is pigmented skin caused by the heat from electronic devices. A laptop case provides a protective cushion as your children watch movies and play games during the long ride. Likewise, volume over 110 decibels causes hearing loss, according to the University of Leicester, so give your kids headphones or ear buds with adjustable volume controls as they listen to their favorite movies or tunes.

Document Safety During the Trip

While AAA reports that 90 percent of holiday travelers drive to their destinations, your family might need to fly to grandma’s house. Safety precautions in the airport start with securing your documents. Keep your children’s tickets, IDs and passports safe in your inside jacket pocket or fanny pack as your hands stay free to corral your energetic offspring. For even greater peace of mind, invest in protection services that secure your family’s identities if your personal documents are stolen or lost as you travel.

Next, keep tabs on your kids before and during your flight. If Nanny in the Clouds isn’t an option, a child leash or Kangakid that serves as both a child carrier and a bag ensures your active little ones stay safely near you before your flight. On the plane, secure your kids in their seat belts or in an approved child protective system. Likewise, sit your kids away from the aisle to prevent them from reaching out for hot beverages or silverware on the food carts.

Pack the Carry-On With Safety in Mind

The carry-on bags your kids bring serve as an important safety measure. In them, pack essential prescription medicines and over-the-counter pain reliever and antacid. Remember the diapers, food and empty water bottle too. Your kids also need plenty of activities and safe toys that aren’t sharp, hard or heavy. With these objects, they stay occupied and safe on the flight to your holiday destination.

car trunk filled with luggage ready to leave for the winter holidays:safety